Catalyst Series: Bror Saxberg on “Learning Engineering”

Catalyst Series: Bror Saxberg on “Learning Engineering”

Last week, at the launch of the Education Innovation Research Network, we welcomed Bror Saxberg, Ph.D., M.D., to Rhode Island. Saxberg is the author of Breakthrough Leadership in the Digital Age, and serves as Chief Education Officer at Kaplan, where he is responsible for the research and development of innovative learning strategies and technologies across Kaplan’s education services.

This event was the first in our Catalyst Series, which is designed to stimulate new ideas in education research, help build connections between theory and practice, and generate new approaches to education innovation.

Scholars, practitioners, and policymakers gathered at the Providence Public Library to share their vision for the future of education in Rhode Island, and to explore ways to improve the learning experience of our students. After opening remarks by Roger Williams University President Donald J. Farish, and Education Commissioner Ken Wagner, Saxberg advocated for an approach grounded in what he calls “learning engineering” – guided by cognitive science research about how expertise, learning, and technology work together to enhance student outcomes.

“We start with how learning actually works,” Saxberg said, because while technology platforms and tools are constantly changing, “what you learn about human learning is an asset with longevity.”

Saxberg discussed the differences between working memory and long-term memory, then identified the necessary steps to mastering complex cognitive tasks. “Each knowledge component has research behind it,” and the evidence – as documented by learning scientists and by Kaplan’s own experiments – shows us that our “intuition is not always the best guide to what works” for learners.

In the discussion that followed, participants had the opportunity to work in small groups, identifying current challenges and suggesting approaches to creating more meaningful, transformative experiences for our students. These discussions were then documented and will be synthesized and reported back out to the network to organize and prioritize next steps.

To learn more about the Education Innovation Research Network, our Catalyst Series, or to join us, visit us at CollaborativeRI.org/EIRN.

The Education Innovation Research Network is a partnership between Eduvate RI, The College & University Research Collaborative, and The Rhode Island Office of Innovation


What is the Education Innovation Research Network?

What is the Education Innovation Research Network?

How can your research help to improve education in Rhode Island?

Join us as we launch a new initiative that will explore challenges across the spectrum in education research. 


On March 23rd we will convene Rhode Island scholars from across campuses and disciplines to share research ideas with policymakers, practitioners and other researchers. This event will help to shape future funding opportunities and expand your network of colleagues. 

Possible topics of exploration... 

  • Impact of Emerging Technologies in Classrooms 
  • Next Generation of Teachers 
  • Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 
  • Assessing Student Performance 
  • Future of Education: Approaches, Networks, Tools 
  • Job Skills for the 21st Century 
  • Diversity and Inclusion 
  • Health & Social Issues that Impact Learning
  • Arts Education & Learning 

Together we will explore questions through an innovative approach that is... 

  • Creative Generates new ideas informed by practitioners and interdisciplinary approaches 
  • Actionable Addresses specific challenges and moves ideas into action through implementation 
  • Scalable Considers how to scale innovations while maintaining effectiveness

If you have any questions, please contact Panhia Lee at panhia@collaborativeri.org.

To register for the launch, click here


The Education Innovation Catalyst Series

The Education Innovation Catalyst Series

As part of the Education Innovation Research Network, we will be hosting a Catalyst Series over the next few months featuring leaders in education innovation who will share their insights with scholars and practitioners in the state. The series will focus on thematic areas of education innovation that are among the short and long-term goals for the future of education in Rhode Island. The goal of this series will be to catalyze new ideas in education research, help build connections between theory and practice, and generate new questions and approaches to education innovation.

Stay tuned for more information on registering for the Catalyst Series.


The Creative and Cultural Economy

New Year, What’s New? 

In April of 2016 we gathered to launch the Arts + Culture Research Network and announce an inaugural research initiative, The Create and Cultural Economy. As we begin the New Year, we want to check in and update you on our progress and let you know what to expect in 2017… 

The long-term vision of the Arts + Culture Research Network is to help grow a robust research resource that can assist Rhode Island’s cultural sector in answering questions related to the growth and vitality of this important part of the economy and to leverage the collective knowledge in our state. 

As the Arts + Culture Research Network expands, some of the questions that are explored might include: What are the health benefits of art? How can history provide guidance to increasing civic engagement? Or how can arts and culture provide innovation in education, especially in STEM fields?  

The Creative and Cultural Economy

In September 2016, four Rhode Island scholars were selected to participate in a cross-disciplinary research team that is exploring how to measure Rhode Island’s creative and cultural assets. Their research will focus on how arts and culture impact the economy, education, community development and quality of life. 

Over the last few months the team has been meeting to determine how they can best leverage their diverse expertise to support a creative and meaningful approach to this collaborative research project. The team determined that they will focus on creating and piloting an easy-to-use assessment tool that will enable public and private stakeholders in Rhode Island’s cultural community to evaluate individual cultural institutions’ progress related to investments made by the organization and their supporters. 

A primary goal for the team is to ensure that their approach is not burdensome for the cultural organizations being assessed, nor for their agents conducting the assessment. It would not duplicate any past or current data collection efforts, but rather enhance future efforts and serve as an ongoing longitudinal analysis that could impact programmatic decisions, operational investments and strategic growth.

This month they plan to engage participants across the state who will use this data in a series of forums. They hope that these forums will help to determine what data is most meaningful and useful for Rhode Island. They will also identify opportunities and potential barriers related to data collection efforts. Each session will include discussion of a particular thematic area where cultural organizations have impact – economy, education, community development and quality of life. 

Stay tuned as we continue to report on their efforts and provide ways for you to engage. 


About the Research Team

Francis J. Leazes, Ph. D., Rhode Island College
A resident of Providence since 1985, Professor Leazes currently is the Director of the undergraduate Public Administration Program at RIC. He is the author of articles on Nonprofit Administration, Urban Politics, Public Budgeting and Finance, and co-authored Providence: The Renaissance City (published by Northeastern University Press, 2004), a political analysis of Providence in the years 1960-2000. His current teaching and research interests include program evaluation, economic development, arts, culture and tourism and the educational opportunities presented by digital technology and public cemeteries.

Stacey Springs, Ph. D., Brown University
Stacey received her PhD in Pharmaceutical Economics and Health Policy, and her research activities bridge methodologies of health care policy analysis, health economics and evidence synthesis. Dr. Springs was recently appointed an Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality (AHRQ) funded Research Fellow (K12) focused on Comparative Effectiveness (CER) and Patient Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR).

Marc Vogl, M.P.A., Brown University
Marc Vogl is a consultant to non-profits, foundations and government agencies in the cultural sector, and a Visiting Assistant Professor of Practice at Brown University’s Center for Public Humanities (2016). Marc provides facilitation, planning, coaching services and research support to arts organizations and funders in the Bay Area and across the country.

William Zywiak, Ph. D., Bryant University
William Zywiak, PhD, has served as an evaluator of three innovative programs: the Byrne Housing Project, the RI Jail Diversion Trauma and Recovery Program, and the California Community College: Student Mental Health Program. He has extensive experience developing assessment measures, analyzing qualitative data, conducting advanced statistical analyses on quantitative data, and reporting and integrating qualitative and quantitative results.


About the Arts & Culture Research Network
In November of 2014, voters of Rhode Island approved a Creative & Cultural Economy Initiative that involved a FY2015-FY2018 investment and distribution of $35M in funding awards to advance the cultural foundation throughout the state. To track the return on this investment, the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts in collaboration with the Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission partnered with The College & University Research Collaborative to launch the Arts + Culture Research Network and an initial research initiative, The Creative and Cultural Economy. The first meeting of the Arts + Culture Research Network was held in April 2016.

About The Collaborative
The Collaborative is a statewide public/private partnership of Rhode Island’s 11 colleges and universities that connects public policy and academic research. The Collaborative’s mission is to increase the use of non-partisan academic research in policymaking and to provide an evidence-based foundation for government decision-making in Rhode Island. Learn more at www.collaborativeri.org.

About RISCA
Established in 1967, the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts (RISCA) is charged by the state legislature to stimulate public interest and participation in the arts and to serve as the liaison to the state arts community.

RISCA affirms and supports the diversity of persons and ideas both within the organization and throughout the state.

About The Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission
The Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission is the state agency for historical preservation and heritage programs. The Commission operates a statewide historical preservation program that identifies and protects historic buildings, districts, structures, and archaeological sites. The Commission also develops and carries out programs to document and celebrate the rich cultural heritage of Rhode Island's people.


Apply to become a Collaborative Scholar

Apply to become a Collaborative Scholar

Benefits include:

  • Increased funding opportunities
  • Access to research network
  • Access to policy makers
  • Expanded audience and impact
  • Editorial and design support
  • Marketing and communications 

Click here to apply today!


Request for Proposals: Collaborative Research Funding

Request for Proposals: Collaborative Research Funding

Join scholars from Rhode Island's 11 colleges and universities to impact public policy through your expertise. Grant proposals will address questions posed by policy leaders in the following topic areas: 

The Collaborative will fund creative research projects based on the expertise and interests of scholars, ranging from $2,000-$25,000.

Important Dates to Consider:

  • Letter of Intent due: July 15, 2016
  • Researcher Notification: Aug 1, 2016
  • Full Proposals due: August 22, 2016

Click here to view the Request for Proposals

For additional questions and to submit Letters of Intent and Full Proposals, please contact Amber Caulkins, Program Director, at amber@collaborativeri.org


Start with a question...Leave with a grant.

Start with a question...Leave with a grant.

Want your research to have an impact on RI? Attend the kick-off event for this year's funding opportunities for Rhode Island researchers.

When: Thursday, June 16, 2016, 5:00-7:00 PM 
Where: State Room, Rhode Island State House 

Click here to register for the event

Each year, The Collaborative funds researchers to address challenges identified by state leaders from the Rhode Island Governor's Office, the House of Representatives, and the Senate. Click here to view previously funded projects.

Join scholars from Rhode Island's 11 colleges and universities to discuss how your expertise could impact public policy.  Grant proposals funded by The Collaborative address the questions posed by policy leaders through creative research projects based on the expertise and interests of scholars. Click here to learn more about our process.  

Attend our meeting on to find out more about our current research areas and questions, and ways that you can participate with The Collaborative.  Award amounts range from $2,000-$25,000. 

This meeting will discuss the following Topic Areas and Research Questions:

All proposals are due via electronic submission no later than 5:00 pm, Friday, July 15, 2016. Researchers will be notified by August 1, 2016.  Full Proposals are due August 22, 2016.  

To view the Request for Proposals, click here.  


Request for Proposals: Arts and Culture Research Initiative

Request for Proposals: Arts and Culture Research Initiative

The Rhode Island State Council On The Arts RISCA), in partnership with The Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission and in collaboration with The College & University Research Collaborative (The Collaborative), are pleased to announce a call for proposals.

To view the Request for Proposals, please click here.

In November 2014, Rhode Island voters approved a Creative & Cultural Economy Initiative. The Initiative involved a FY2015-FY2018 investment and distribution of $35M in funding awards to improve cultural infrastructure throughout the state. To track the return on this investment, a team of Rhode Island college and university-based researchers will be commissioned to explore the impact of this initiative. The research team will explore the initiative by addressing three priorities: economic return, programmatic return and quality of life return.

If you have any questions, please contact Amber Caulkins at amber@collaborativeri.org.


Research into Action: URI Students Present Their Research to State Legislators at RI State House

Research into Action: URI Students Present Their Research to State Legislators at RI State House

Students from an honors political science class at the University of Rhode Island traveled to the Rhode Island State House last month to share the results of their semester long research projects with state legislators and policy staff. The presentations were the culmination of a semester spent tackling challenging policy topics including marijuana legalization, the future of the Paw Sox stadium, and the success of foster youth.

The presentations were part of The College & University Research Collaborative’s (The Collaborative) Public Policy Speaker Series and gave students the opportunity to answer questions from state leaders on how their research might impact important policy issues in Rhode Island. The students were there to present their research as the final assignment for an honors course taught this past spring by Dr. Shanna Pearson-Merkowitz in the Political Science department at the University of Rhode Island.

According to Dr. Pearson-Merkowitz, the goal was for the class to learn about public policy in the United States through conducting their own research, while also gaining valuable writing and presenting skills that are essential for the work world--even if students do not go on to a career in policy or government.

Student Savanna Bebe said that although this was one of the more difficult classes she has taken, it was also one of the most rewarding. “This course required a significant amount of more group work, research, writing, and editing when compared to other courses I have taken,” she said. “There was more responsibility for independent learning within our groups.” 

At the start of the semester, students were asked to select research questions that had been identified by Rhode Island policy leaders. The students met twice a week over the course of the semester and worked in small groups to research their topics. The class offered a unique real world experience by allowing students to explore timely public policy challenges and then share their findings with the policy leaders who would be using their research to assist them in their decision making.

“This research would have been hard to conduct thoroughly without the ample time we received to dedicate solely to this topic,” said student Brittany Kraft. “As the semester progressed, we discovered how multifaceted and interwoven potential solutions to our research question were.”

“This method of teaching was far more influential and lasting because it was taught through practical application rather than through simply listening to a professor,” said student Bridget Hall. By researching and creating their proposals, Hall explained, the class learned about the formation and uses of public policy and gained a better understanding of their individual topics.  

Prior to turning in final drafts, Dr. Pearson- Merkowitz explained that the students’ reports went through multiple rounds of editing for clarity and organization. In addition, before heading to the State House to present before public officials, the students went through multiple trial runs where they dissected what worked when presenting. “Through this process they learned to accept constructive criticism, write and speak clearly, and effectively exude professionalism,” she said.

The presentations at the State House provided the students with a firsthand look at how legislators will debate and potentially apply their findings. After each presentation the students fielded questions from the legislators in the room and were able to provide in-depth answers and additional information on their individual topics.

Dr. Pearson-Merkowitz explained that in most classes, students turn in high quality term papers and research projects, but once graded, are not revisited and end up in the recycling bin. “The reason I wanted to do this was so that all of the effort and energy that my students devoted to their research would not be just for a grade,” she said. “I feel very happy and proud of the work my students and I completed and I'm very happy for it to be public.” 

“The most important thing I learned from presenting at the State House was that lawmakers care deeply about making Rhode Island a more attractive state in order to both entice residents to stay and to attract new residents,” said Hall.

Students Mark Bocchini, Catherine Garcia, Dakota Porto, and Sarah Sangeado presented on “Marijuana Policy in Rhode Island,” Bridget Hall and Michael Steiner presented on “The Future of Pawtucket’s McCoy Stadium,” and Savanna Bebe, Vanessa Kolb, Brittany Kraft, and Robert Krulee presented on “Improving the Transition to Adulthood for Rhode Island Foster Youth.”

The official publications of the students’ research projects will be available on The Collaborative’s website in the coming month. 

The Collaborative’s goal is to provide policymakers in Rhode Island with non-partisan academic research that will support them in their decision making. This course was developed through a grant Dr. Pearson-Merkowitz received from The Collaborative.

by Sabrina Guilbeault. Sabrina is a student Providence College and is currently interning with The Collaborative with the goal of improving her writing, research, and communication skills. She recently completed  a research project for The Collaborative with Dr. Robert Hackey and Erika May on evaluating the performance of state health insurance marketplaces. Read the article here.


The Collaborative and RISCA Host Arts and Culture Research Event

The Collaborative and RISCA Host Arts and Culture Research Event

On Monday, March 28, The Collaborative and the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts hosted a launch event for the Arts and Culture Research Network at The Biltmore Hotel in Providence.  The event had a successful turnout, with guests coming from across the state with diverse backgrounds in arts, culture, public policy, and research. Guests heard from RI Senate President M. Teresa Paiva Weed; Donald J. Farish, President of Roger Williams University; and Sunil Iyengar, Research and Analysis Director of the National Endowment for the Arts. 

April 13 continued the dialogue on strengthening research in arts and culture with a Research Meeting at the Rhode Island Philharmonic in East Providence.  Scholars from across the state came together to share and brainstorm ideas for upcoming research projects in various topic areas including healthcare, engineering, early childhood education, criminal justice, workforce development, regional competitiveness, transportation, and infrastructure.


New Rhode Island Arts + Cultural Research Network from RISCA and The Collaborative

New Rhode Island Arts + Cultural Research Network from RISCA and The Collaborative

The Rhode Island State Council On The Arts (RISCA) and The Collaborative have announced the creation of a new Arts & Culture Research Network.

The Rhode Island Arts & Culture Research Network will look at the role that arts & culture plays in key areas of importance in Rhode Island. 

Read more about this new network in the Providence Business News article “Arts & Culture Research Network formed to explore role of arts in R.I. economy.”


Grants Awarded for 16 New Research Projects

Grants Awarded for 16 New Research Projects

We are pleased to announce the funding of 16 new research projects that will support public policy in Rhode Island. These projects will be completed by 24 scholars from the state’s 11 colleges & universities, who will be examining a variety of subjects in the topic areas of Energy, Higher Education, Infrastructure, Municipal Services, Regional Competitiveness, Social Services, and Workforce.

“This is a great way to harness the resources of our state’s top-tier colleges and universities and direct them towards solving some of our biggest challenges,” Governor Gina Raimondo said. “Everyone has a role to play in Rhode Island’s economic comeback, and these research projects will help strengthen our efforts to make Rhode Island a place of opportunity.”

Over the next several months, scholars will be working to complete these projects which will provide data and evidence related to timely issues facing Rhode Island.

“The House greatly values the independent research conducted by our higher education institutions. The Collaborative provides a thorough analysis on major policy issues in the state that are invaluable to our members in preparing for our discussions and debate,” Nicholas A. Mattiello, Speaker of the Rhode Island House of Representatives.

Topic areas were chosen by consensus among state policy leaders from the Rhode Island Governor’s office, the House of Representatives, and the Senate.

“The Collaborative has developed a unique model that starts with consensus among the legislative and executive leadership of our state. The research capabilities of our distinguished public and private colleges and universities provide an extraordinary resource for us as policymakers to utilize as we address the state’s challenges,” M. Teresa Paiva Weed, President of the Rhode Island Senate.

The Collaborative is now in its third year of research, with its inception beginning with the Rhode Island Foundation’s Make It Happen initiative.

“We are excited to see policymakers in the General Assembly and Governor’s office taking advantage of the opportunity to put the state’s colleges and universities to work researching the issues they will take up. Who better to turn to than local researchers to provide the data they need to make solid, evidence-based policy decisions,” said Neil Steinberg, the Foundation’s president and CEO.

We are looking forward to sharing the results of these research projects in 2016, including at our second annual Public Policy Speaker Series: Research Into Action events where scholars will be presenting the findings of their research projects with policy leaders, state officials, and community members.

“We are excited to have so many scholars from across the state examining challenging state issues and providing non-partisan, academic research to support public policy,” said Amber Caulkins, program director for The Collaborative.

2015/2016 FUNDED RESEARCH PROJECTS AND SCHOLARS

Energy

Rhode Island’s Energy Outlook: Sustainable Energy Infrastructure and Improving Energy Efficiency in Housing – Bahram Nassersharif, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island; and Laura Briggs, MARC, Rhode Island School of Design

Higher Education

Examining the Educational Success of RI Latinos at Local Colleges and Universities – Eve Veliz-Moran, Ph.D. and Kara Cebulko, Ph.D., Providence College

Impact of Special Student Support Services on College Retention – Joanne Walsh, Ph.D., New England Institute of Technology

Exploring Options for a Higher Education Funding Formula in Rhode Island – Thomas Schmeling, Ph.D., and Erik Christiansen, Ph.D., Rhode Island College

Increasing the Educational Attainment of Community College Students – Karen Kortz, Ph.D., and Jeanne Mullaney, M.Ed., Community College of Rhode Island

Infrastructure

The Benefits and Drawbacks of New and Emerging Transportation Infrastructure Projects in Rhode Island – Jonathan Harris, M.I.D., Johnson & Wales University

Funding Infrastructure Improvements in the State of Rhode Island – Nicole Martino, Ph.D., Roger Williams University

Municipal Services

Developing a Blueprint for Municipal Collaboration in Rhode Island – Rupayan Gupta, Ph.D., Roger Williams University

Strategies for Responding to Fiscal Emergency in Three States – June Speakman, Ph.D., Roger Williams University

Regional Competitiveness

Creating a Report Card for State Health Insurance Marketplaces – Robert Hackey, Ph.D., Providence College

Casino Gambling in Rhode Island – Challenges and Opportunities – Patrick Kelly, Ph.D.; Julia Camp, Ph.D.; and Carol Hartley, CPA, Providence College

Workforce

Rhode Island’s Businesses: Professional Incentives and Employee Retention – Carla White Ellis, Ph.D., Johnson & Wales University; and Kathy Peno, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island

Occupational Outcomes for Rhode Island Residents: A Case Study of Rhode Island College – Francis J. Leazes, Jr., Ph.D.; Mikaila Mariel Lemonik Arthur, Ph.D., Rhode Island College; and Rupayan Gupta, Ph.D., Roger Williams University

Social Services

A New Model for Latino College Student Retention – Sami Nassim, Ph.D., Salve Regina University

Educational Outcomes for Rhode Island’s Latino Students: The Role of Parental Legal Status – Kalina Brabeck, Ph.D., Rhode Island College

Raising Test Scores: The Impact of Lead Exposure on Latino Students’ Success – Anna Aizer, Ph.D., Brown University



Research for Rhode Island Annual Event - July 14, 2015

Research for Rhode Island Annual Event - July 14, 2015

On July 14th, 2015, The Collaborative hosted its annual Research for Rhode Island event to celebrate and highlight our first two years of research completed by our funded Resource Network members and to launch our third year of research. Scholars, government leaders, and members of the community joined us at the Rhode Island Foundation, as we shared more about the mission and work of The Collaborative.

Opening remarks were delivered by Rhode Island Foundation President Neil Steinberg, Governor Gina M. Raimondo, Senate President M. Teresa Paiva Weed, Representative Kenneth A. Marshall, and Brown University President Christina H. Paxson, who voiced their support for The Collaborative and spoke to the role of The Collaborative in Rhode Island.

This event gave us the opportunity to show our appreciation for the support that The Collaborative has received during the past two years and to recognize the value and importance of the work of our funded scholars, not only to our organization, but to the State of Rhode Island as well.


Public Policy Speaker Series (No. 3) - June 4, 2015

Public Policy Speaker Series (No. 3) - June 4, 2015

On June 4, 2015, The Collaborative hosted the third installment of its Public Policy Speakers Series at the Rhode Island Foundation.

Three scholars, who participated in the cross-institutional Collaborative Research Project, Strategies for a Competitive Rhode island, shared the research results from their individual projects with policy leaders, fellow scholars, and community members, providing a look at Rhode Island's competitiveness in a variety of areas.

Presentations Included:

Does Cap and Trade Work? A Market-Based Approach to Energy Sustainability
Suchandra Basu, Ph.D., Rhode Island College

What States Need to Foster Innovation and Economic Growth
Joseph Roberts, Ph.D., Roger Williams University

Good for Business: How States Can Be More Business Friendly
Ramesh Mohan, Ph.D., Bryant University

This event was the final event in The Collaborative's first Public Policy Speaker Series. Each of the events in this series featured presentations by scholars who were funded by The Collaborative.


Current Research Areas

Each of our current research areas includes a broad range of questions posed by state policy leaders. Grant proposals funded by The Collaborative address these questions through creative research projects based on the expertise and interests of scholars.


A Competitive Rhode Island:
Access to Capitol for Rhode Island Businesses  |  Impact of Legalizing Marijuana (public health, social justice, and tax revenue impacts)  |  Gambling Revenue  |  Tourism Marketing  |  Affordable Care Act  I  Impact of Closed Casinos  |  Funding for Charter Schools and Mayoral Academies

Energy:
Energy Efficiency in RI Housing  |  Increasing Energy Efficiency in Older Rental Units  |  Energy Needs for the Region  |  Sustainable Energy Costs Best Practices  |  Impact of Regional Natural Gas Pipeline on Energy Costs

Higher Education:
Public Higher Education Funding Formulas  |  Impact of Student Support Services  |  Increasing Educational Attainment in the Labor Force  |  Increasing Opportunities for Students to Connect with RI Companies  |  Decreasing Out-Migration

Infrastructure:
Potential Alternative Uses for McCoy Stadium  |  Vacant Stadium Use in Other States  |  Impact of Public Transportation on Economic Development and Access to Jobs  |  Infrastructure Funding Options in Other States  |  Using RIPTA to Connect Workers to Current and Emerging Job Centers

Municipal Services:
Strategies for Supporting Financially Distressed Municipalities  |  Supporting Municipal Collaboration  |  Best Practices in Municipal Collaboration from Other States

Social Services:
Transitioning Foster Youth Into the Workforce  |  How to Close Achievement Gaps for Latino Populations and the Impact on the Economy  |  How to Support Individuals with Disabilities as They Enter the Workforce

Workforce:
Job Creation Return on Investment  |  Incentives for Firm Relocation and/or Incentives for Firm Creation  |  RI’s Labor Market Information System  |  Tax Credits and Job Creation  |  Workforce Development Initiatives within Companies


The Collaborative in "Rhode Island Monthly"

The Collaborative in "Rhode Island Monthly"

Learn more about how Rhode Island is working with The Collaborative and the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative to support public policy in the state in the article “Strength in Numbers: Crunching the Numbers to Avoid Costly Mistakes” published in the May 2015 edition of Rhode Island Monthly.

Click here to read the full article.


Public Policy Speaker Series (No. 2) - April 14, 2015

Public Policy Speaker Series (No. 2) - April 14, 2015

The Collaborative hosted its second Public Policy Speaker Series event on April 14, 2015. Four scholars funded by The Collaborative presented the results from their research projects, focusing on different topics in the research areas of Infrastructure, Regional Competitiveness, and Workforce.

Policy leaders, community members, and local university students attended the event, which was held at the Rhode Island Foundation.

Presentations Included:

The Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities Needed for Growing Occupations in Rhode Island
Matthew Bodah, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island

Improving Infrastructure through Public Private Partnerships
Amine Ghanem, Ph.D., Roger Williams University

Millennials on the Move: Attracting Young Workers through Better Transportation
Jonathan Harris, M.I.D., Johnson & Wales University

Choosing a Health Exchange for Rhode Island
Jessica Mulligan, Ph.D., Providence College

This was the second event in The Collaborative's three-part Public Policy Speaker Series.


Student Researcher: Rachel-Lyn Longo, University of Rhode Island

Student Researcher: Rachel-Lyn Longo, University of Rhode Island

Rachel-Lyn Longo worked as a Student Researcher under the direction of Shanna Pearson-Merkoowitz, Ph. D., an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Rhode Island on the research project "Ensuring Paid Family Leave Pays Off".

This project was developed as part of The Collaborative’s initiative to engage undergraduate students in research for state leaders.  


Rachel-Lyn Longo is a recent graduate of the University of Rhode Island and holds a B.A. in Political Science and Psychology.

Her work as a student researcher began in the spring of 2014, when she studied Paid Family Leave Policies in Rhode Island during a Senior Seminar with Professor Shanna Pearson-Merkowitz. Throughout her undergraduate career, Rachel-Lyn has been interested in familial health and wellbeing, which has sparked a curiosity for further research on PFL following the completion of this project. In the future, she plans to continue her research in public policy.



Public Policy Speaker Series (No. 1) - March 24, 2015

Public Policy Speaker Series (No. 1) - March 24, 2015

On March 24, 2015, we launched our first Public Policy Speaker Series. This event was the first part of a three-part series, which highlights the results from research projects funded in our second year of research.

Results from three research projects were shared by four Rhode Island scholars, whose projects focus on key issues in the areas of Infrastructure, Regional Competitiveness, and Workforce.

Scholars shared information regarding their research process and research findings during their presentations, followed by a brief questions and answers session opened to the attendees.

Presentations Included:

The Economic Impact of Expanding Medicaid
Liam Malloy, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island
Shanna Pearson-Merkowitz, Ph.D.,University of Rhode Island

The Road to Better Bridges: Strategies for Maintaining Infrastructure
Nicole Martino, Ph.D., Roger Williams University

Rhode Island Unemployment: Is There a Labor Market Mismatch?
Neil Mehrotra, Ph.D., Brown University


Current Research Projects

We are looking forward to sharing the results of our current research projects over the next several weeks.

Please check back for research updates.

WORKFORCE 

The Economic Benefits of a Flexible Workplace
by Barbara Silver, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island

The Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities Needed for Growing Occupations in Rhode Island
by Matthew Bodah, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island

Preparing Rhode Island’s Workforce for the Jobs of the Future
by Elzotbek Rustambekov, Ph.D., Bryant University

Rhode Island Unemployment: Is There a Labor Market Mismatch?
by Neil Mehrotra, Ph.D., Brown University

INFRASTRUCTURE

Improving Infrastructure through Public Private Partnerships
by Amine Ghanem, Ph.D., Roger Williams University

Millennials on the Move: Attracting Young Workers through Better Transportation
by Jonathan Harris, M.I.D., Johnson & Wales University

The Road to Better Bridges: Strategies for Maintaining Infrastructure
by Nicole Martino, Ph.D., Roger Williams University

REGIONAL COMPETITIVENESS

Choosing a Health Exchange for Rhode Island
by Jessica Mulligan, Ph.D., Providence College

The Economic Impact of Expanding Medicaid
by Liam Malloy, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island; Shanna Pearson-Merkowitz, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island

Ensuring Paid Family Leave Pays Off
by Shanna Pearson-Merkowitz, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island; Rachel-Lyn Longo, Student Researcher, University of Rhode Island

Strategies for a Competitive Rhode Island
by Suchandra Basu, Ph.D., Rhode Island College; Ramesh Mohan, Ph.D., Bryant University; Joseph, Roberts, Ph.D., Roger Williams University

MANUFACTURING

Rhode Island’s Maker-Related Assets
by Dawn Edmondson, M.S., New England Institute of Technology; Susan Gorelick, Ph.D., New England Institute of Technology; Beth Mosher, MFA, Rhode Island School of Design


Spring Intern: Lily Jackson

Spring Intern: Lily Jackson

The Collaborative is excited to welcome Lily Jackson as one of our new Communications Interns. Lily will be supporting staff with social media and public relations, and will also provide support in areas related to public policy research. Lily is a junior at the University of Rhode Island and is majoring in communications. Outside of the Collaborative, Lily divides her time between classes and her involvement in the Public Relations Student Society of America. Through this internship, she hopes to expand her communication skills and learn more about public policy.


February Newsletter

Interested in learning more about our current research projects and seeing how The Collaborative is working with scholars to support economic policy in Rhode Island?

Be sure to check out our FEBRUARY 2015 NEWSLETTER.


Funded Scholars Discuss Their Research with Providence Business News

Funded Scholars Discuss Their Research with Providence Business News

Rhode Island scholars discuss the research that they are working on for the Collaborative and offer a look into how they are exploring important economic issues in Rhode Island in the Providence Business News article "Researchers tackle R.I. infrastructure issues."

(Pictured in Photo from left: Helen Mederer, University of Rhode Island; and Barbara Silver, University of Rhode Island - Photo courtesy of Michael Salerno, PBN Photo)


New Research Projects Announced

The Collaborative is pleased to announce that we have funded 12 new research projects in the areas of Workforce, Manufacturing, Regional Competitiveness, and Infrastructure.

These 12 projects are being completed by 16 scholars from Rhode Island's higher education institutions who are using their academic expertise t0 support economic development in Rhode Island.

The Collaborative will share the results of their research with state policy leaders, community organizations, and the public in the new year.

Workforce

Examining the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed for current and emerging jobs in Rhode Island
Matthew Bodah, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island

The Importance of Workplace Flexibility to a Robust Rhode Island Economy: Findings from the University of Rhode Island
Barbara Silver, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island

Labor Market Mismatch and the Great Recession in Rhode Island
Neil Mehrotra, Ph.D., Brown University

Examining Rhode Island’s educational and workforce development systems and how they align with current and emerging job openings
Elzotbek Rustambekov, Ph.D., Bryant University

Manufacturing

Developing a comprehensive inventory database of maker-related assets in Rhode Island (Collaborative Research Project)
Dawn Edmondson, M.S., New England Institute of Technology
Susan Shim Gorelick, Ph.D., New England Institute of Technology
Beth Mosher, MFA, Rhode Island School of Design

Regional Competitiveness

Strategies for a Competitive Rhode Island: Energy, Innovation, and Ease of Doing Business (Collaborative Research Project)
Suchandra Basu, Ph.D., Rhode Island College
Ramesh Mohan, Ph.D., Bryant University
Joseph Roberts, Ph.D., Roger Williams University

Family leave policy in the United States and its utilization in Rhode Island
Shanna Pearson-Merkowitz, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island

State vs. Federal Exchanges: What does this mean for Rhode Island’s economy?
Jessica Mulligan, Ph.D., Providence College

Examining the Economic Impact of the Medicaid Expansion and the Affordable Health Care Act on the Nation, and the Implications for Rhode Island (Collaborative Research Project)
Liam Malloy, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island
Shanna Pearson-Merkowitz, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island

Infrastructure

How do other states fund their infrastructure development and maintenance, and how do these models compare to Rhode Island’s funding structure? How have funding mechanisms changed over time?
Nicole Martino, Ph.D., Roger Williams University

Addressing the legal and statutory issues in order to implement public/private partnerships in the state of Rhode Island
Amine Ghanem, Ph.D., Roger Williams University

Examining the transportation trends of millennials and the migration of millennials in Rhode Island, and evaluating the existing and future infrastructure projects in the state
Jonathan Harris, M.I.D., Johnson & Wales University


The Collaborative on NBC 10 Noon News

The Collaborative on NBC 10 Noon News

Our Program Director Amber Caulkins announced our new funded research projects and discussed the Collaborative with Frank Coletta on today's broadcast of NBC 10's Noon News.
Click here to watch the interview

Read more about these projects and our organization in the Providence Business Journal.


Supporting Our State Leaders

Supporting Our State Leaders

In just a few weeks, Rhode Island will welcome a new Governor and the start of the new legislative session. As our state leaders continue to focus on reviving Rhode Island’s economy, the Collaborative is excited to be fulfilling our goal of providing policy makers with data and evidence to support their decision-making.

Last May, the Collaborative released our first round of research projects based on questions that were developed by consensus from the policy directors of the RI House of Representatives, the RI Senate, and the RI Governor’s Office. In the New Year, the Collaborative will share more research in the focus areas of manufacturing, infrastructure, workforce, and regional competitiveness.

Two years ago, the Rhode Island Foundation challenged our state to “Make It Happen,” and since then, the Collaborative has been doing just that. We now have a robust network of scholars from the 11 colleges and universities in the state who are working on research that can help inform policy discussions, drive change in our state, and move Rhode Island forward.


Scholar Snapshot - Nicole Martino

Scholar Snapshot - Nicole Martino

Dr. Nicole Martino, an Assistant Professor of Engineering at Roger Williams University, shares more about her work with Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) technology and discusses how this technology can offer a more economical approach in evaluating the condition and safety of our bridges in her Scholar Snapshot.

READ NICOLE MARTINO'S SCHOLAR SNAPSHOT


Scholars Connect from Across Rhode Island

Over the last two months, the Collaborative has welcomed a new group of scholars who are engaged in creating action research to support economic development for our state. In June, researchers from Rhode Island’s 11 public and private colleges and universities gathered at the State House to discuss how they would address this year’s round of questions from our Panel of Policy Leaders.

Following these meetings, scholars participated in working groups that focused on each of our topic areas and then went on to form research teams. Once again, we are impressed with the excitement and engagement from scholars and their interest in using their expertise to tackle some of the challenges facing our state.

One of our goals is to continuously bring innovation to our process, and this year, we are including more opportunities for researchers to collaborate and engage with community organizations as they structure their research.

For researchers who were not able to attend our first round of working group meetings, but are interested in finding out about funding opportunities or creating a Scholar Snapshot, please contact us at amber@collaborativeri.org


May Newsletter

May Newsletter

On May 5, 2014, the Collaborative publicly released the results from our first year of research at our Research Into Action event. Read the Research Briefs and Research Summaries from our five funded research teams and learn more about our past and future activities in our May Newsletter.

UPCOMING EVENTS

June 17, 2014 | 5:00 to 7:00 PM
Working Group Meeting: Workforce & Manufacturing

June 24, 2014 | 5:00 to 7:00 PM
Working Group Meeting: Regional Competitiveness & Infrastructure

Pictured in Photo, From Left:
House Majority Leader John DeSimone; Speaker of the House Nicholas Mattiello; Neil Steinberg, President & CEO, the Rhode Island Foundation; President David Dooley, University of Rhode Island; Senate President
M. Teresa Paiva Weed; Governor Lincoln Chafee; Daniel Egan, President AICU Rhode Island

(Photo Courtesy of the Rhode Island Foundation)




Turning Research Into Action

Turning Research Into Action

In the recent Chronicle of Higher Education article “Scholars Wrestle with Challenges of Engaging with Policy Makers,” author Beth McMurtrie reports on a conference held at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. McMurtrie begins the article by asking, “What does it mean to do policy-relevant research?”

In Rhode Island, the Collaborative has created an innovative response to that question—Research Into Action. The Collaborative is built around the concept that it is possible to connect policy makers and academics in a way that enables them to work together to address critical issues.

On May 5, 2014, we brought together members of our community, state leaders, and scholars in an event that not only celebrated the completion of our first year of research, but that also provided an important opportunity to see how the work of the Collaborative can make an impact in a real way. The research that scholars work on as part of the Collaborative serves as a data-driven response to the concerns of policy leaders in our state, and we work to make this research accessible so that it can be readily utilized.

At the Collaborative, we ask our own questions to guide our work with policy leaders and scholars. One question we strive to answer every day is: How do we take our research and make it actionable? We know that it is not enough to just provide research; it is also necessary to communicate research in a clear and understandable way to a mainstream audience. The Collaborative is a connection point between policy questions, scholars, and the community that utilizes one of Rhode Island’s richest attributes—academic expertise.

We are working to use all the available tools to reach beyond our higher education institutions and impact real world challenges. Is it possible to retain the rigor of academic research and also provide evidence and data that can be applied to the topical challenges our state is facing? We think so, and one of the ways this is happening is through the Collaborative.

Amber Caulkins, Program Director for the Collaborative


The Collaborative Receives $75,000 Award From The Rhode Island Foundation

The Collaborative Receives $75,000 Award From The Rhode Island Foundation

On May 5, 2014 the Rhode Island Foundation announced their generous award of $75,000 to support the Collaborative in our second year.  We thank the foundation for their continued support and look forward to building our program and expanding our Resource Network over the course of year two.

Read more about the Collaborative's participation in the Rhode Island Foundation's Make It Happen initiative on the RIF Blog.

Pictured in Photo: Neil Steinberg, President and CEO, Rhode Island Foundation


February Newsletter

Our goal at The Collaborative is to connect public policy with academic research for Rhode Island. This sounds great, but what does that really mean, and how are we actually connecting these two critical areas?

Find out how we have been working to meet our goal in our February newsletter.

Upcoming Events

March
New Research Areas for 2014/2015 determined

April
Campus outreach meetings will be held on each of the 11 college and university campuses. For more information, please contact The Collaborative.

Research from 2013/2014 will be released


Executive Suite Interview with the Collaborative and Footnote

Executive Suite Interview with the Collaborative and Footnote

WPRI's Executive Suite Host, Ted Nesi, talks with Program Director for the Collaborative, Amber Caulkins, and Co-Founder and CEO of Footnote, Joe Morone, about how the Collaborative and Footnote are working together to share the work of  scholars with Rhode Island policymakers and with audiences across the state.

Click here to watch the interview in full.


SCHOLAR SNAPSHOT | SHANI CARTER

SCHOLAR SNAPSHOT | SHANI CARTER

Shani D. Carter, a Professor of Management at Rhode Island College, is one of 13 scholars across Rhode Island who have received funding from the Collaborative in 2013. Carter possesses an extensive research background and has completed projects in a variety of areas, from the effect of diversity laws on the workforce to her more recent work in outcomes assessment for students at RIC.

Carter published her first paper while earning her master’s degree in Human Resources, and since then, her body of work has grown, and her topics of interest have expanded. “If you look at my [curriculum] vitae, you will see that over time, there are completely different areas of research,” says Carter. Carter has authored and published several papers concerning diversity in the workforce, where she examined past diversity and equal opportunity laws, and has also published a journal article presenting her studies of the outcomes for female faculty who are on the track to tenure. She co-authored a book chapter on the same topic. Currently, Carter is working on a paper concerning PhD outcomes assessment and the methods in which to determine if those who hold doctoral degrees have met the required educational outcomes for their chosen PhD programs.

Although Carter’s research does not typically focus on policy making, Carter earned her B.A. in Government and spent her last semester in Washington where she studied the Job Training Partnership Act. Her experience and interest using Current Population Study (CPS) data from the Census Bureau “goes back over twenty years” when she was working on her thesis for her master’s degree. At that time, Carter was interested in various types of occupational employment and variables which caused major shifts in the economy. Two decades later, Carter continues to use CPS data in her courses at Rhode Island College and gives her students the opportunity to utilize occupational data from the Department of Labor in their work. Carter finds that having her students access and analyze this data in her courses “really brings human resources theory to life.”

In addition to her research and teaching in the School of Management at Rhode Island College, Carter is also very involved with student success across the RIC campus. In her role as the Special Assistant to the Vice President of Academic Affairs for Outcomes Assessment, Carter reviews and provides feedback on the annual reports measuring student learning outcomes submitted by the different academic departments at RIC. In this position, Carter also organizes semi-annual colloquiums where faculty present how they are conducting academic assessment in their departments in order to help create a “culture of assessment” and to help faculty think how those assessments could shape student learning, teaching, pedagogy, and the content of their courses.

With a rich research background and plenty of published works, Carter states that she enjoys both the research and writing process, and views writing “as a creative process that can’t be forced.” “I want to do research and I want to write,” says Carter, “and I want to be able to inspire my students through doing that.”

Following the Collaborative’s first Regional Competitiveness working group in 2013, Carter formed a research team with Bryant University Professor of Economics Jongsung Kim, who specializes in Labor Economics. Together, they will use their experience in working with detailed occupations (Kim also has an extensive background in working with CPS Data) to examine labor data, as well as local and regional income tax records, for their research project “Competitiveness in Occupations and the Optimal Tax in Rhode Island.” The results of their study will be published in May 2014.


SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Bishop, J.H. and Carter, S.D. (1991). How accurate are recent BLS occupational projections? Monthly Labor Review. October, pp. 37-43. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ43406...

Carter, S.D. (2012). Demographic Changes and Equal Employment Opportunity Legislation: Implications for Leveraging Workforce Diversity in the Field of Human Resource Development. In: Scott, C.L. & Byrd, M.Y. (eds). Handbook of Research on Workforce Diversity in a Global Society: Technologies and Concepts. Hershey, Pennsylvania, New York: IGI Global. http://www.igi-global.com/book...

Carter, S.D. (2010, February/March).  Differences in Career Paths of Female and Male Faculty in the United States. eNewsline. AACSB (Associate to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business). http://www.aacsb.edu/publicati...

Bilimoria, D., Liang X., Carter, S.D., & Turell, J.M. (October 31, 2013). Gender differences in the academic work experiences of faculty at early, middle and late career stages. Handbook of Research on Promoting Women's Careers. Susan Vinnicombe (Editor), Ronald J. Burke (Editor) , Stacy Blake-Beard (Editor). London: Southgate Publishers. http://www.e-elgar.co.uk/booke...

Carter, S.D. (2009). A Ten Step Process for Creating Outcomes Assessment Measures for an Undergraduate Management Program: A Faculty Driven Process. Professional File, 113, pp. 1-15. Association for Institutional Research. http://www.airweb.org/Educatio...


Academic Communities Partner With Policy Leaders

Academic Communities Partner With Policy Leaders

In their article "How Scholars Are Helping Political Leaders Tackle Tough Economic Problems," Footnote's Executive Editor Diana Brazzell and Assistant Editor Suzannah Weiss discuss the wealth of research and expertise that exists at colleges and universities and take a closer look at how the Collaborative is working to move research into action.

Read the full article here.

Pictured, from left: Diana Brazell, Footnote Co-Founder and Executive Editor; Suzannah Weiss, Footnote Assistant Editor


FOCUS ON: Research

FOCUS ON: Research

In his framing article “Manufacturing, Innovation & Economic Growth: The Challenges for Rhode Island and the Country,” Bryant University Associate Professor of Economics Edinaldo Tebaldi provides an overview of the rise and fall of manufacturing in the United States and explores the potential for a resurgence of manufacturing in the country and specifically in Rhode Island.

Read the full article here.


The Collaborative and Footnote have partnered together to make academic research more accessible to a broad audience. This article is part of a series of articles published through this partnership.


WPRO Interview with the Collaborative

Kicking off 2014 for the Collaborative, our Program Director Amber Caulkins shared our mission and current research initiatives in an interview with Steve Klamkin on WPRO Saturday Morning News.

Click here to listen to the podcast in full. 


2013 Wrap Up

2013 Wrap Up

2013 was an exciting year for the Collaborative -- and we've published our first newsletter to share all the highlights.

Click here to see how we spent 2013.


2013 Advanced Manufacturing Research Grant Awarded!

The Collaborative is pleased to announce that we have awarded funding to a research team of scholars from our Advanced Manufacturing Resource Network.

This cross-institutional team will complete a research project that analyzes efforts to re-shore manufacturing that have taken plan in other states and that determines implications for Rhode Island.

The team will work with Footnote to translate their Research Report into an accessible, engaging Research Summary written for a broad audience.

We look forward to sharing their research with you in the spring.


Research Team and Their Funded Proposal:

Richard Brown, University Of Rhode Island, Professor of Materials and Chemical Engineering
Gilbert Brunnhoeffer, Roger Williams University, Associate Professor of Construction Management
Dean Plowman, New England Institute of Technology, Chair of the Department of Mechanical/Electrical Engineering Technology
Linda A. Riley, Roger Williams University, Professor of Engineering

“Manufacturing Capabilities in Rhode Island and the Potential for University Partnerships”
This project will provide a database of needs and plans from representative businesses engaged in a wide range of manufacturing in Rhode Island and will examine the roles of higher education institutions in supporting the re-shoring of manufacturing in the state..


2013 Arts & Culture Research Grants Awarded!

The Collaborative is pleased to announce that we have awarded funding to two research teams from our Arts & Culture Resource Network.

Each team of scholars will complete research projects that uniquely examine the impact of arts and culture in our local economies and that determine how to effectively measure investments in this area in Rhode Island. These projects will also focus on strategies that other states have used to successfully support the arts and culture economy.

These cross-institutional research teams will work with Footnote to translate their Research Reports into accessible, engaging Research Summaries written for a broad audience.

We look forward to sharing their research with you in the spring.


Research Teams and Their Funded Proposals

Michelle Bach-Coulibaly, Brown University, Senior Lecturer of Theatre, Speech, and Dance
Matthew Gregg, Roger Williams University, Associate Professor of Economics
Rupayan Gupta, Roger Williams University, Associate Professor of Economics

“The Economic Impact of Arts-Based Afterschool Programs"
This project is designed to identify and examine both in-school and out-of school arts-based afterschool programs and determine their economic impact in Rhode Island.

And

Deborah Johnson, Providence College, Professor of Art History, Women’s Studies
Francis J. Leazes Jr., Rhode Island College, Professor of Political Science

“Measuring Successful Arts and Culture Strategies”
For this project, Leazes and Johnson will comparatively analyze a set of successful arts initiatives throughout the United States and New England and will produce findings that address two of the Arts & Culture research questions posed by policy leaders.


2013 Regional Competitiveness Research Grants Awarded!

The Collaborative is pleased to announce that we have awarded funding to two research team of scholars from our Regional Competitiveness Resource Network.

Each cross-institutional team will complete a research project that analyzes economic policy to better understand Rhode Island's economy and how the state's economy interacts with other areas and regions.

These teams will work with Footnote to translate their Research Report into accessible, engaging Research Summaries written for a broad audience.

We look forward to sharing their research with you in the spring.


Research Teams and Their Funded Proposals:

Shani D. Carter, Rhode Island College, Professor of Management
Jongsung Kim, Bryant University, Professor of Economics

“Competitiveness in Occupations and the Optimal Tax in Rhode Island”
For this project, Carter and Kim will analyze labor data and local and regional income tax records to help determine if personal income tax rates in Rhode Island help or hinder regional competitiveness in the state in regard to attracting highly-skilled employees.

And

Dawn King, Brown University, Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies
Joseph A. Ilacqua, Bryant University, Professor of Economics

“Analyzing the State of Local Business and Organizational Purchasing in Rhode Island”
This project will provide a snapshot of local purchasing in Rhode Island, including evidence and data, concerning local purchasing trends for large Rhode Island Institutions/Corporations.


Working Groups

Working Groups

There are multiple ways scholars can participate in The Collaborative. One of these ways, is through our working groups. During the month of October, The Collaborative hosted our first series of working groups focused on the three research areas. Held at the State House, these meetings brought together scholars from 11 different institutions and provided a first look at the depth of expertise that resides in Rhode Island. In addition to researchers, we also welcomed Governor Lincoln D. Chafee, Senator Josh Miller, and House Majority Leader Nick Mattiello.

Scholars at these working groups examined the specific questions of policy leaders and began to discuss how they would approach research projects. These working groups allowed participants to connect with other researchers and to potentially form research teams who have the opportunity to receive funding from The Collaborative.


The Collaborative's Launch Event

The Collaborative's Launch Event

On August 28, 2013, The Collaborative hosted its launch event at the Rhode Island Foundation. This event was the first opportunity to bring together our Panel of Policy Leaders, Fellows, and Scholars who have expertise within our three research areas. This year, our fellows are focusing their research on economic development in Rhode Island and specifically in Arts & Culture, Regional Competitiveness, and Advanced Manufacturing. This event allowed policy leaders to share with our college and university partners some of the challenges they face and how academic research can provide data and evidence to support policy decisions. It was also an opportunity for participants to begin to see connections that exist across the state and how we can work together to provide data for informed decision making in Rhode Island.